Sleep Safe Cot Mattresses

Coming soon to our mattress range is the revolutionary fabric “Sleep Safe” which features an anti microbial bugshield agent, this fabric will be used as an option on our Cool Flow swap top range of cot mattresses.

Whilst still undergoing trials and product development at present, we hope to bring this new mattress cover to the Comfort Kids range of cot mattresses in early 2014.

The initial sizes to be used for this mattress are in our standard cot bed sizes 120 x 60cm and 140 x 70cm which fit Mamas and Papas mattresses sizes 200 and 400 respectively.

What is a Coolmax Cot Mattress

What is Coolmax?

Coolmax fabric is a temparature sensitive and adaptive fabric that has been designed to wick away heat if the surface of the fabric becomes too hot

By using a cot mattress  witha CoolMax® cover or with a CoolMax® removable top pad as on our Coolmax Pillow Top cot mattress, this will help to solve the problem of heat build-up, A very common complaint with domestic memory foam mattresses and also to a lesser extent on cot and cot bed mattresses with a foam surface. CoolMax® fabric whisks away moisture as well as or maybe even better than any natural fibres found in organic materials such as cotton. This allows your body to regulate its tempurature.

The end result, a better more restful sleep for your baby ( and so you also ).

CoolMax® : a unique cot mattress cover to give you a cool and more comfortable nights sleep.

A CoolMax cot mattress offers you a cleaner and healthier sleep environment thanks to its hypo allergenic and its anti microbial properties. The Comfort Kids CoolMax® pilloe top cover is easy zipped off to remove and can be machine-washed.

Online Direct Sales

Because the development in recent years many of our contract customers retail sales have moved more and more to online Internet sales, and many well known high street retailers are now pushing this forward as the driving force for sales.

Comfortex as bulk manufacturers of mattresses not only have to sell goods to distribution warehouses for our larger contract customers, we are also often asked to do direct dispatch on behalf of our customers, because of these sort of developments we now find ourselves manufacturing packing and dispatching goods direct to domestic addresses on behalf of our larger customers.

This has lead to simple addition to our factory shop which was to sell online starting at first on ebay then Amazon and now with our e commerce site www.mattress-factory.co.uk, which has lead to a fast growth of our online sales month by month and has now become a significant part of our business.

Feel assured you will be buying quality goods at factory direct prices, a phrase often used to put a spin on sales promotion, but in our case is just the truth we operate out of a state of the art 57,000 sq ft modern factory in Oldham Greater Manchester with in house gerber cutting, a sewing division an automated cnc foam conversion section. and hot melt and water based adhesive mattress lamination lines. we enen have a PU cold cure foam moulding plant where we can produce our own foam.

 

Baby Pictures

Below are some brilliant examples of baby photography gathered from around the web, Good photography using perspective and angle light and situation se can achive really memorable photographs. Some parents go their entire life without ever taking a photo of their baby. Your little one will not be a baby for long so make sure you capture that special moment is lost, and help to preserve those precious early years of your child’s life and your own experience. Please click the links to see the Studio / Photographer

Eco Baby | Ec.gc.ca

Look Up | M19

Pineapple | Megvagy

Baby Swim | Eythor

Flower baby | Anne Geddes

You gonna be a Star | Jane-art

R2fullreg | PDXerin Erin Tole

Cute Dolls | M19

Angels | Anne Geddes

Blooming Flowers | Ane Geddes

Cool Baby | Wallpaperseek

Baby on a Basket | Holger Urbanek

Asian Influence Newborn | Nelms Photographic Artistry

My Favorite Baby | YAYforPOPCORN

Baby Mermaid | Lolosad

Baby Ian | Stacy PHOTOgraphy

|

Unique Baby Gift | Wallpaper S

Baby | SecondArt

Miracles | Karen Pfeiffer

Heads Up Kaleigh | Karenlynn Hunter

Big Brother, Little Sister | Bitsy Baby Photography [Rita]

Six Months | Carrie F.

Athens, Ga Baby | Andie Freeman

Baby Ashton | Jovijovijovi

Adopt a Baby | cofcc.org

Seven Months | Carrie F.

Baby Blues | Heidi Hope

Caitlyn V | Carl Hall

Bed Of Roses | Anne Geddes

Baby Levi – Newborn in hands | RebeccaVC1

Baby in Arms | Paul.lloyd17

Girly girl | Heidi Hope

Baby-Like Flowers | M19

Friends | Platingham

Rubber Ducky | Sonia Mason

A Special Bed | M19

Athens, Ga Newborn | Andie Freeman

Sleepy When Wet | Amifobornot

How Pocket Springs Work

Pocket springs work differently to conventional spring units as each spring act independently form each other, whereas a traditional spring unit is usually made up of interlinked springs in a wire frame, on a pocket spring unit each spring is encased in its own fabric pocket and will react individually to any pressure or weight applied to it.

The result of this is a more comfortable sleeping surface which responds to the body better and reacts better to movement and or pressure applied to the unit.

Because of these unique features this type of mattress pocket springing is used in most high end domestic mattresses and has now found its way in to the cot mattress market and here at Comfort Kids you can get a really high quality pocket spring mattress for probably much less than you would normally pay for a standard sprung cot mattress. as you will be buying from the Manufacturer and supplied direct from the factory.

 

 

Top Baby Names 2011

Are you looking for the perfect name for your baby ? Have a look at Take at the most popular baby names of 2011 to see if any suit.

You may well decide to name your baby after a relative or go for a unique baby name which is reletivley unknown. Whatever name you choose, make sur you think about how well it suits your babys surname and also think about if you wish to add any middle names, too.

Baby Girl Names 2011

1 OLIVIA
2 LILY
3 SOPHIE
4 AMELIA
5 EMILY
6 JESSICA
7 GRACE
8 AVA
9 RUBY
10 MIA
11 CHLOE
12 EVIE
13 ISABELLA
14 SOPHIA
15 POPPY
16 ISLA
17 ELLA
18 LUCY
19 FREYA
20 DAISY
21 MAISIE
22 LILLY
23 ISABELLE
24 CHARLOTTE
25 ELLIE
26 SUMMER
27 MEGAN
28 HOLLY
29 LAYLA
30 EVA
31 ERIN
32 MILLIE
33 LOLA
34 PHOEBE
35 LEXI
36 LACEY
37 IMOGEN
38 SCARLETT
39 SIENNA
40 EMMA
41 MOLLY
42 HANNAH
43 ALICE
44 AMY
45 BROOKE
46 KATIE
47 ABIGAIL
48 LEAH
49 JASMINE
50 GRACIE
51 AMBER
52 ROSIE
53 SOFIA
54 MATILDA
55 FLORENCE
56 ELIZABETH
57 FAITH
58 AMELIE
59 GEORGIA
60 ANNA
61 MAYA
62 MADISON
63 JULIA
64 REBECCA
65 BETHANY
66 PAIGE
67 MADDISON
68 NIAMH
69 KAYLA
70 ISABEL
71 BELLA
72 ESME
73 ISOBEL
74 LEXIE
75 LAUREN
76 CAITLIN
77 WILLOW
78 ZOE
79 SKYE
80 ROSE
81 ZARA
82 KEIRA
83 ELEANOR
84 ELIZA
85 EMILIA
86 MARTHA
87 HOLLIE
88 EVELYN
89 HEIDI
90 TILLY
91 DARCY
92 EVE
93 NICOLE
94 ELSIE
95 SARAH
96 LIBBY
97 HARRIET
98 ABBIE
99 MAISY
100 MYA

Baby Boy Names 2011

1 HARRY
2 JACK
3 OLIVER
4 CHARLIE
5 ALFIE
6 JACOB
7 THOMAS
8 JAMES
9 RILEY
10 ETHAN
11 JOSHUA
12 WILLIAM
13 GEORGE
14 MAX
15 DANIEL
16 NOAH
17 OSCAR
18 LOGAN
19 ARCHIE
20 DYLAN
21 LUCAS
22 JAKE
23 SAMUEL
24 JOSEPH
25 TYLER
26 JAYDEN
27 LEO
28 LEWIS
29 RYAN
30 MASON
31 FINLEY
32 HENRY
33 ALEXANDER
34 ADAM
35 HARRISON
36 FREDDIE
37 BENJAMIN
38 CALLUM
39 LIAM
40 LUKE
41 ISAAC
42 MATTHEW
43 JAMIE
44 CONNOR
45 ALEX
46 THEO
47 NATHAN
48 KAI
49 EDWARD
50 TOBY
51 HARVEY
52 HARLEY
53 AIDEN
54 BEN
55 FINLAY
56 MICHAEL
57 AARON
58 OLLIE
59 CAMERON
60 SAM
61 DAVID
62 ZACHARY
63 LEON
64 OWEN
65 SEBASTIAN
66 TOMMY
67 RHYS
68 BOBBY
69 JENSON
70 KYLE
71 LOUIS
72 KAYDEN
73 LUCA
74 EVAN
75 JACKSON
76 BLAKE
77 KIAN
78 CALEB
79 DEXTER
80 LOUIE
81 JUDE
82 ZAC
83 TAYLOR
84 REECE
85 RORY
86 ASHTON
87 HAYDEN
88 FRANKIE
89 ARTHUR
90 BAILEY
91 GABRIEL
92 STANLEY
93 CODY
94 ELLIOT
95 JAY
96 BILLY
97 JOHN
98 AIDAN
99 COREY
100 JOEL

FSID Cot Mattress Guidelines

FSID is (The Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths) and  is the UK’s leading baby charity aiming to prevent unexpected deaths in infancy and also to promote infant health. FSID fulfils these aims by the following :

  • By funding research
  • By supporting families whose babies have died suddenly and unexpectedly.
  • By disseminating information on infant health, baby care and sudden infant deaths to health professionals and the general public
  • By working with professionals to improve investigations when a baby dies

The services offered by FSID also includes the following :

  • Having a Helpline for parents, carers and health professionals and bereaved families
  • Providing a wide range of publications and resources on reducing the risk of cot death and safe baby care
  • Access to a network of trained befrienders to support bereaved families
  • Promoting a busy programme of training, events and Family Days Out throughout the UK
  • The Care of Next Infant (CONI) Scheme, with the NHS, to support bereaved families when they have subsequent babies.

FSID as an organisation operates throughout all of the UK, witha presence in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.  As well as the staff team in head office there are eight Regional Development Officers who actively promote all the  FSID’s campaigns across the UK.

To visit the FSID Official Website

To Download the FSID Guidelines in PDF Format click this Link FSID-Guidelines.pdf

Cot Mattresses To Fit Mamas And Papas

Mamas and Papas cots have 3 mattress sizes which are reffered to as sim200 sim300 and sim400 or also as size 200 size 300 and size 400.

The mattresses that fit these sizes are

  • Size 200 120 x 60cm
  • Size 300 126 x 62½cm
  • Size 400 139 x 69cm

The main mattress size being 139 x 69cm which is only 10mm different than the standard size cot bed mattress which is 140 x 70cm which fits perfectly in mamas and papas cots and cot beds.

The sizes below will fit well into a Mamas & Papas cot or cotbed Size 400 and are common cot bed mattress sizes

  • 140 x 70cm
  • 140 x 69cm
  • 139 x 70cm
  • 139 x 69cm

The sizes below will fit well into a Mamas & Papas cot or cotbed Size 300 and are common cot mattress sizes

  • 126 x 62.5cm
  • 126 x 63cm
  • 126 x 64cm
  • 127 x 64cm

The Standard is that a mattress should fit snug into the base of the cot or cotbed but not be too tight as to cause the cot side to jam, or be too tight to fit sheets easily, if yoy push the mattress to one side of the cot bed the gap should be no more than 4cm as a rule, the same for the head and foot end if you push the mattress up to the head end of the cot the gap at the foot end again should be no more than 4cm.

 

Coolmax Cot Mattresses

Soon to be introduced to the Comfort Kids range of mattresses is the Pillow Top Coolmax Mattress.

This will feature our cool flow mattress base with a zip off removable top layer featuring a coolmax top layer, we are aiming to introduce this new product to the range in early 2013.

By the addition of a coolmax top layer you get comfort and a temperature adaptive surface to help regulate the mattress and stop overheating. This mattress will also feature our top of the range pocket spring interior.

This type of mattress is usually well over the £100 pound mark but we are hoping to introduce this mattress at a special offer price of £79.99

Keep checking back in early 2013 to see when this product becomes avaliable.

 

SIDS and Cot Mattresses

The standard advice on cot mattresses id to use a new cot mattress for each new child if possible, and make sure any cot mattress is clean and dry, there is reaserch that links the use of second hand cot mattresses expecially if these cot mattresses have come from another home and increased risk of cot death.

What is cot death?

Cot death is the diagnosis given when an apparently perfectly healthy baby dies, without warning, and for no clear reason ( Sudden Infant Death Syndrome SIDS ).

When a baby dies suddenly, doctors and investigators will try to find out why this has happened. This often includes a post mortem examination, which will look into aspects such as seeing where the baby died, also a review of the baby’s medical records, amongst other factors.

In less than 50% of cot deaths there is an underlying health condition or another factor, such as an illness or if  accident is found to have attributed the cause.

Cot deaths that have no apparent reason and after a thorough examination are most often registered as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) also called sudden infant death, unexplained death, or cot death. Sadly, there are still just over 300 cot deaths in the UK each year although the figuer as a percentage has dropped significantly since the early 1990s..

Although cot death is one of the most common causes of death in newborn babies, it is still a rare occurance.

Why does SIDS (cot death) happen?

The answer to this is that no one knows really knows, some babies just seem to die in this way. It could well be be a combination of factors that affect a baby at a very vulnerable stage in their formative development.

One theory is that some babies could have a problem with the part of the brain that controls breathing and coordination. And  that these babies may not respond if their breathing gets slightly restricted, in situations such as if there are bedclothes covering their nose or mouth.

When does (SIDS) cot death happen?

Cot death often occurs when a baby is thought to be sleeping. This is often at night, but it can also happen during the day  in shorter sleeps, could be in a pram, or it could even happen whilst in their parent’s arms. One factor is that Cot deaths are more common in the wintermonths , though it’s not clear why this is.

Which babies are most at risk of cot death ?

Around  90% of cot deaths happen in the first six months of the infants life. And the most of these are within the first three months, the peak being in the second month. Then the risk of cot death falls dramatically as your baby grows older, and after a year very few cot deaths ever occur.

Please remember that cot death is a rare occurance. The vast majority of babies pass through their first six months without any problems whatsoever.

It is also a very rare occurance for cot death to happen twice in the same family. One other unknown is that It very rare that babies of South Asian families to fall victim to a cot death. The highest rate of cot deaths are from babies of mums who are under the age of 20 years.

Of course there are always other factors that you will never be able to change that will put a baby at a higher risk of suffering a cot death.

    • If the baby is a boy :  The ratio is about 60 % boys to 40 % girls.
    • If the baby was born prematurely i.e before 37 weeks.
  • If the baby had a low  weight at birth i.e. less than 5½ lb (2½ Kg).

Can I reduce my baby’s risk of cot death?

There’s no failsafe way in order to prevent an infant suffering a cot death. All you can do a number of reccomended things that will help to keep your baby safer and hopefully reduce the risk.

Firstly always put your baby to sleep on his or her back, when in a cot or in a moses basket. And for the first six months it is a good idea to have your baby in a room with you.

Healthy babies when placed on their back to sleep are not more likely to choke. This position is the safest  position for your baby to sleep in.

When your baby gets to around five months or six months old, your baby will probably start to roll. It is at this age that the risk of cot death reduces dramatically and thei it is safe to start to let your baby find his or her most comfortable sleeping position. Still however put your baby down to sleep on his or her back at first.

If you wake up at night and see that your baby is on his or her front, and the baby is younger than six months old, gently roll your baby on to their back. Babies that are older than this usually can roll onto their backs by themselves. You really dont don’t need to get up and check throughout the night, as the baby will most likely to change position regularly throughout the night whilst sleeping.

Do not smoke during your pregnancy or allow anyone else to smoke around your baby. It is the one clear finding, If you smoke during and or after pregnancy,  your baby’s risk of cot death increases. the fact is that cot death is much more common in babies who are regularly exposed to smoke.

The risk to your baby is also increased if anyone in the house is a smoker that smolkes in the house, even if it’s done in another room and even with a window open. People who live and or visit the house should smoke outside so that the air around your baby is always smoke free. And definatley never smoke in the same room that your baby is in.

The following tips may also help to reduce your baby’s risk of cot death, although the evidence is less clear in these findings / suggestions.

Try not to let your baby get too hot. Overheating has been linked to an increased risk of cot death. Try to keep the room your baby sleeps in at a comfortable temperature of between 16°C and 20°C. Do not  put your baby’s cot or cot bed near a radiator or a heater or fire, and not in direct sunlight. And do not place a hot water bottle, and definatley not an electric blanket in your baby’s cot.

If your baby is too hot look for the following :

  • is your baby sweating
  • does he or she have damp hair
  • is there signs of a heat rash
  • is the baby breathing rapidly
  • Is the baby restless
  • and signs of fever

Touch your baby’s tummy or neck to feel if she or he is too hot or to cold then adjust his or her bedding accordingly. If you feel of the babys hands or feet you probably wont know as it is  normal for these parts of a babys body to feel colder.

If hot take off any hats and or any extra layers of clothing as soon as you come indoors after having been outside, even if it means waking your baby up.

Do not sleep on a sofa or armchair with your baby.  put your baby back in the cot or cotbed on a suitable mattress that is clean dry and fits well, without large gaps at the sides. Surfaces not really suotable for youbaby to sleep on are beanbags, fleeces and other very soft surfaces.

If your baby gets  too hot, then remove a blanket. If too cold then add one. A blanket that is folded in half will form two layers and act like two blankets. Avoid the use of duvets quilt and pillows if your baby is under a year old.

Always breastfeed your baby if possible  breastfeeding may well reduce the risk of cot death in babies. as breastmilk increases your baby’s resistance to all sorts of infections.

Take your baby for regular check up’s and always keep up to date with your babys immunisations. and seek medical advice as soon as you see that iyour baby has become unwell.

Daytime naps?

The advice for safe sleeping whilst your baby is having daytime naps, is the same as at night. Lay your baby down to sleep on his or her back and make sure your baby canmot cover his or her head with bedclothes whilst sleeping.

Again for the first six months always try to have your baby in the same room as you whilst sleeping. A moses basket, Crib or Carry Cot or Travel Mattress are all good ways to keep your baby nearby while you get on with what you want need to do.

Will sleep monitor’s or other devices help?

A breathing monitor could  be recommended to youby your doctor, usually if your baby has already had a life threatening incident with breathing, or if the baby has other cot death risk factors which have been diagnosed. However, healthy babies usually do not need a breathing monitor.

Is it safe to sleep with my baby?

The safest place for your baby to sleep for the first six months is in a cot or Moses basket in the same room as you not in bed with you.

Never share a bed with your baby, if you or your partner do the following:

  • If you are are a smoker, even if you do not smoke whilst near your baby.
  • If you have been drinking alcohol.
  • If you have taken any medication or drugs.
  • If you are very tired.

The risks of you co sleeping with your baby are often increased if your baby:

  • was premature i.e born before 37 weeks.
  • weighed less than 2.5kg at birth 5.5lb

Where can I get more information?

The Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths (FSID) is by far the best place to go it offers lots of information and is a professionnal organisation which specialises in this below is a link to their website and a downloadable document with their guidelines, and you can also talk to your health visitor if you are worried about cot death and your baby. Remember though cot death is rare.

Or download the FSID guidelines here SIDS-Guidelines.pdf