Category Archives: Baby

Baby Pictures

Below are some brilliant examples of baby photography gathered from around the web, Good photography using perspective and angle light and situation se can achive really memorable photographs. Some parents go their entire life without ever taking a photo of their baby. Your little one will not be a baby for long so make sure you capture that special moment is lost, and help to preserve those precious early years of your child’s life and your own experience. Please click the links to see the Studio / Photographer

Eco Baby | Ec.gc.ca

Look Up | M19

Pineapple | Megvagy

Baby Swim | Eythor

Flower baby | Anne Geddes

You gonna be a Star | Jane-art

R2fullreg | PDXerin Erin Tole

Cute Dolls | M19

Angels | Anne Geddes

Blooming Flowers | Ane Geddes

Cool Baby | Wallpaperseek

Baby on a Basket | Holger Urbanek

Asian Influence Newborn | Nelms Photographic Artistry

My Favorite Baby | YAYforPOPCORN

Baby Mermaid | Lolosad

Baby Ian | Stacy PHOTOgraphy

|

Unique Baby Gift | Wallpaper S

Baby | SecondArt

Miracles | Karen Pfeiffer

Heads Up Kaleigh | Karenlynn Hunter

Big Brother, Little Sister | Bitsy Baby Photography [Rita]

Six Months | Carrie F.

Athens, Ga Baby | Andie Freeman

Baby Ashton | Jovijovijovi

Adopt a Baby | cofcc.org

Seven Months | Carrie F.

Baby Blues | Heidi Hope

Caitlyn V | Carl Hall

Bed Of Roses | Anne Geddes

Baby Levi – Newborn in hands | RebeccaVC1

Baby in Arms | Paul.lloyd17

Girly girl | Heidi Hope

Baby-Like Flowers | M19

Friends | Platingham

Rubber Ducky | Sonia Mason

A Special Bed | M19

Athens, Ga Newborn | Andie Freeman

Sleepy When Wet | Amifobornot

Top Baby Names 2011

Are you looking for the perfect name for your baby ? Have a look at Take at the most popular baby names of 2011 to see if any suit.

You may well decide to name your baby after a relative or go for a unique baby name which is reletivley unknown. Whatever name you choose, make sur you think about how well it suits your babys surname and also think about if you wish to add any middle names, too.

Baby Girl Names 2011

1 OLIVIA
2 LILY
3 SOPHIE
4 AMELIA
5 EMILY
6 JESSICA
7 GRACE
8 AVA
9 RUBY
10 MIA
11 CHLOE
12 EVIE
13 ISABELLA
14 SOPHIA
15 POPPY
16 ISLA
17 ELLA
18 LUCY
19 FREYA
20 DAISY
21 MAISIE
22 LILLY
23 ISABELLE
24 CHARLOTTE
25 ELLIE
26 SUMMER
27 MEGAN
28 HOLLY
29 LAYLA
30 EVA
31 ERIN
32 MILLIE
33 LOLA
34 PHOEBE
35 LEXI
36 LACEY
37 IMOGEN
38 SCARLETT
39 SIENNA
40 EMMA
41 MOLLY
42 HANNAH
43 ALICE
44 AMY
45 BROOKE
46 KATIE
47 ABIGAIL
48 LEAH
49 JASMINE
50 GRACIE
51 AMBER
52 ROSIE
53 SOFIA
54 MATILDA
55 FLORENCE
56 ELIZABETH
57 FAITH
58 AMELIE
59 GEORGIA
60 ANNA
61 MAYA
62 MADISON
63 JULIA
64 REBECCA
65 BETHANY
66 PAIGE
67 MADDISON
68 NIAMH
69 KAYLA
70 ISABEL
71 BELLA
72 ESME
73 ISOBEL
74 LEXIE
75 LAUREN
76 CAITLIN
77 WILLOW
78 ZOE
79 SKYE
80 ROSE
81 ZARA
82 KEIRA
83 ELEANOR
84 ELIZA
85 EMILIA
86 MARTHA
87 HOLLIE
88 EVELYN
89 HEIDI
90 TILLY
91 DARCY
92 EVE
93 NICOLE
94 ELSIE
95 SARAH
96 LIBBY
97 HARRIET
98 ABBIE
99 MAISY
100 MYA

Baby Boy Names 2011

1 HARRY
2 JACK
3 OLIVER
4 CHARLIE
5 ALFIE
6 JACOB
7 THOMAS
8 JAMES
9 RILEY
10 ETHAN
11 JOSHUA
12 WILLIAM
13 GEORGE
14 MAX
15 DANIEL
16 NOAH
17 OSCAR
18 LOGAN
19 ARCHIE
20 DYLAN
21 LUCAS
22 JAKE
23 SAMUEL
24 JOSEPH
25 TYLER
26 JAYDEN
27 LEO
28 LEWIS
29 RYAN
30 MASON
31 FINLEY
32 HENRY
33 ALEXANDER
34 ADAM
35 HARRISON
36 FREDDIE
37 BENJAMIN
38 CALLUM
39 LIAM
40 LUKE
41 ISAAC
42 MATTHEW
43 JAMIE
44 CONNOR
45 ALEX
46 THEO
47 NATHAN
48 KAI
49 EDWARD
50 TOBY
51 HARVEY
52 HARLEY
53 AIDEN
54 BEN
55 FINLAY
56 MICHAEL
57 AARON
58 OLLIE
59 CAMERON
60 SAM
61 DAVID
62 ZACHARY
63 LEON
64 OWEN
65 SEBASTIAN
66 TOMMY
67 RHYS
68 BOBBY
69 JENSON
70 KYLE
71 LOUIS
72 KAYDEN
73 LUCA
74 EVAN
75 JACKSON
76 BLAKE
77 KIAN
78 CALEB
79 DEXTER
80 LOUIE
81 JUDE
82 ZAC
83 TAYLOR
84 REECE
85 RORY
86 ASHTON
87 HAYDEN
88 FRANKIE
89 ARTHUR
90 BAILEY
91 GABRIEL
92 STANLEY
93 CODY
94 ELLIOT
95 JAY
96 BILLY
97 JOHN
98 AIDAN
99 COREY
100 JOEL

FSID Cot Mattress Guidelines

FSID is (The Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths) and  is the UK’s leading baby charity aiming to prevent unexpected deaths in infancy and also to promote infant health. FSID fulfils these aims by the following :

  • By funding research
  • By supporting families whose babies have died suddenly and unexpectedly.
  • By disseminating information on infant health, baby care and sudden infant deaths to health professionals and the general public
  • By working with professionals to improve investigations when a baby dies

The services offered by FSID also includes the following :

  • Having a Helpline for parents, carers and health professionals and bereaved families
  • Providing a wide range of publications and resources on reducing the risk of cot death and safe baby care
  • Access to a network of trained befrienders to support bereaved families
  • Promoting a busy programme of training, events and Family Days Out throughout the UK
  • The Care of Next Infant (CONI) Scheme, with the NHS, to support bereaved families when they have subsequent babies.

FSID as an organisation operates throughout all of the UK, witha presence in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.  As well as the staff team in head office there are eight Regional Development Officers who actively promote all the  FSID’s campaigns across the UK.

To visit the FSID Official Website

To Download the FSID Guidelines in PDF Format click this Link FSID-Guidelines.pdf

SIDS and Cot Mattresses

The standard advice on cot mattresses id to use a new cot mattress for each new child if possible, and make sure any cot mattress is clean and dry, there is reaserch that links the use of second hand cot mattresses expecially if these cot mattresses have come from another home and increased risk of cot death.

What is cot death?

Cot death is the diagnosis given when an apparently perfectly healthy baby dies, without warning, and for no clear reason ( Sudden Infant Death Syndrome SIDS ).

When a baby dies suddenly, doctors and investigators will try to find out why this has happened. This often includes a post mortem examination, which will look into aspects such as seeing where the baby died, also a review of the baby’s medical records, amongst other factors.

In less than 50% of cot deaths there is an underlying health condition or another factor, such as an illness or if  accident is found to have attributed the cause.

Cot deaths that have no apparent reason and after a thorough examination are most often registered as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) also called sudden infant death, unexplained death, or cot death. Sadly, there are still just over 300 cot deaths in the UK each year although the figuer as a percentage has dropped significantly since the early 1990s..

Although cot death is one of the most common causes of death in newborn babies, it is still a rare occurance.

Why does SIDS (cot death) happen?

The answer to this is that no one knows really knows, some babies just seem to die in this way. It could well be be a combination of factors that affect a baby at a very vulnerable stage in their formative development.

One theory is that some babies could have a problem with the part of the brain that controls breathing and coordination. And  that these babies may not respond if their breathing gets slightly restricted, in situations such as if there are bedclothes covering their nose or mouth.

When does (SIDS) cot death happen?

Cot death often occurs when a baby is thought to be sleeping. This is often at night, but it can also happen during the day  in shorter sleeps, could be in a pram, or it could even happen whilst in their parent’s arms. One factor is that Cot deaths are more common in the wintermonths , though it’s not clear why this is.

Which babies are most at risk of cot death ?

Around  90% of cot deaths happen in the first six months of the infants life. And the most of these are within the first three months, the peak being in the second month. Then the risk of cot death falls dramatically as your baby grows older, and after a year very few cot deaths ever occur.

Please remember that cot death is a rare occurance. The vast majority of babies pass through their first six months without any problems whatsoever.

It is also a very rare occurance for cot death to happen twice in the same family. One other unknown is that It very rare that babies of South Asian families to fall victim to a cot death. The highest rate of cot deaths are from babies of mums who are under the age of 20 years.

Of course there are always other factors that you will never be able to change that will put a baby at a higher risk of suffering a cot death.

    • If the baby is a boy :  The ratio is about 60 % boys to 40 % girls.
    • If the baby was born prematurely i.e before 37 weeks.
  • If the baby had a low  weight at birth i.e. less than 5½ lb (2½ Kg).

Can I reduce my baby’s risk of cot death?

There’s no failsafe way in order to prevent an infant suffering a cot death. All you can do a number of reccomended things that will help to keep your baby safer and hopefully reduce the risk.

Firstly always put your baby to sleep on his or her back, when in a cot or in a moses basket. And for the first six months it is a good idea to have your baby in a room with you.

Healthy babies when placed on their back to sleep are not more likely to choke. This position is the safest  position for your baby to sleep in.

When your baby gets to around five months or six months old, your baby will probably start to roll. It is at this age that the risk of cot death reduces dramatically and thei it is safe to start to let your baby find his or her most comfortable sleeping position. Still however put your baby down to sleep on his or her back at first.

If you wake up at night and see that your baby is on his or her front, and the baby is younger than six months old, gently roll your baby on to their back. Babies that are older than this usually can roll onto their backs by themselves. You really dont don’t need to get up and check throughout the night, as the baby will most likely to change position regularly throughout the night whilst sleeping.

Do not smoke during your pregnancy or allow anyone else to smoke around your baby. It is the one clear finding, If you smoke during and or after pregnancy,  your baby’s risk of cot death increases. the fact is that cot death is much more common in babies who are regularly exposed to smoke.

The risk to your baby is also increased if anyone in the house is a smoker that smolkes in the house, even if it’s done in another room and even with a window open. People who live and or visit the house should smoke outside so that the air around your baby is always smoke free. And definatley never smoke in the same room that your baby is in.

The following tips may also help to reduce your baby’s risk of cot death, although the evidence is less clear in these findings / suggestions.

Try not to let your baby get too hot. Overheating has been linked to an increased risk of cot death. Try to keep the room your baby sleeps in at a comfortable temperature of between 16°C and 20°C. Do not  put your baby’s cot or cot bed near a radiator or a heater or fire, and not in direct sunlight. And do not place a hot water bottle, and definatley not an electric blanket in your baby’s cot.

If your baby is too hot look for the following :

  • is your baby sweating
  • does he or she have damp hair
  • is there signs of a heat rash
  • is the baby breathing rapidly
  • Is the baby restless
  • and signs of fever

Touch your baby’s tummy or neck to feel if she or he is too hot or to cold then adjust his or her bedding accordingly. If you feel of the babys hands or feet you probably wont know as it is  normal for these parts of a babys body to feel colder.

If hot take off any hats and or any extra layers of clothing as soon as you come indoors after having been outside, even if it means waking your baby up.

Do not sleep on a sofa or armchair with your baby.  put your baby back in the cot or cotbed on a suitable mattress that is clean dry and fits well, without large gaps at the sides. Surfaces not really suotable for youbaby to sleep on are beanbags, fleeces and other very soft surfaces.

If your baby gets  too hot, then remove a blanket. If too cold then add one. A blanket that is folded in half will form two layers and act like two blankets. Avoid the use of duvets quilt and pillows if your baby is under a year old.

Always breastfeed your baby if possible  breastfeeding may well reduce the risk of cot death in babies. as breastmilk increases your baby’s resistance to all sorts of infections.

Take your baby for regular check up’s and always keep up to date with your babys immunisations. and seek medical advice as soon as you see that iyour baby has become unwell.

Daytime naps?

The advice for safe sleeping whilst your baby is having daytime naps, is the same as at night. Lay your baby down to sleep on his or her back and make sure your baby canmot cover his or her head with bedclothes whilst sleeping.

Again for the first six months always try to have your baby in the same room as you whilst sleeping. A moses basket, Crib or Carry Cot or Travel Mattress are all good ways to keep your baby nearby while you get on with what you want need to do.

Will sleep monitor’s or other devices help?

A breathing monitor could  be recommended to youby your doctor, usually if your baby has already had a life threatening incident with breathing, or if the baby has other cot death risk factors which have been diagnosed. However, healthy babies usually do not need a breathing monitor.

Is it safe to sleep with my baby?

The safest place for your baby to sleep for the first six months is in a cot or Moses basket in the same room as you not in bed with you.

Never share a bed with your baby, if you or your partner do the following:

  • If you are are a smoker, even if you do not smoke whilst near your baby.
  • If you have been drinking alcohol.
  • If you have taken any medication or drugs.
  • If you are very tired.

The risks of you co sleeping with your baby are often increased if your baby:

  • was premature i.e born before 37 weeks.
  • weighed less than 2.5kg at birth 5.5lb

Where can I get more information?

The Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths (FSID) is by far the best place to go it offers lots of information and is a professionnal organisation which specialises in this below is a link to their website and a downloadable document with their guidelines, and you can also talk to your health visitor if you are worried about cot death and your baby. Remember though cot death is rare.

Or download the FSID guidelines here SIDS-Guidelines.pdf

Second Hand Cot Mattresses

Are second hand cot mattresses Safe ?

If buying, buy a new mattress for a new baby if possible. It’s been shown that there is a link between the use of second-hand mattresses and cot deaths.

The link between second hand cot and cot bed mattresses and cot death is more apparent with cot mattresses that have come from another household ( for example, bought second hand or given to you second hand ). However, there is still an increased risk of cot death if you re use a mattress which was bought brand new for an older child in your own home.

It’s been suggested that bacterial infections may play a role in cot death. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a type of bacteria that has been identified as a possible cause of cot death in several studies. S. aureus has been found in used mattresses but it’s not yet known whether the presence of this bacteria in used mattresses could be a direct cause of cot death.

Ideally, always buy a new cot mattress for a new baby. However, if you have to re use a mattress only do so if it meets the following criteria:

the cot mattress was made with a waterproof covering

the cot mattress cover is in good condition – no tears, splits or holes

the cot mattress is firm, doesn’t sag anywhere and fits the cot without any gaps

Be sure to clean and dry the mattress thoroughly before use.

Source : Bupa

SIDS and Used Cot Mattresses

Babies who sleep routinley on a cot mattress that has previously used by another child may be at and increased risk of cot death.

According to a study published by researchers at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Glasgow, who believe that there may be a link between the bacteria in previousley used cot mattresses and cot deaths.

The Study of 131 cases of cot deaths which they looked at, found that around half of the babies had died on previousley used mattresses. And of this around 33% of those used mattresses had come from another home.

This four year study was published in the British Medical Journal and found that routine use of a baby’s mattress that was previously used by another child was significantly associated with an increased risk of sudden Infant death syndrome SIDS, especially if the mattress had come from another home.

These findings back up an earlier survey which was carried out by researchers at the hospital back in 1997.

Dr David Tappin a consultant paediatrician at the Yorkhill NHS Trust said : ” What we would say to parents is that the most important steps to take to reduce cot death are to put babies on their back to sleep and to stop smoking during pregnancy and keep the baby smoke-free after the birth.

“Our research is not saying there is a definite risk from used mattresses but the way of avoiding a potential risk is to use new mattresses.”

To put this into perspective and to avoid scare mongering, In the UK around 500 babies die every year from sudden Infant death syndrome. whereas there are 690000 babies born each year in the UK so the risk is 1 in 1380, having said this if a new cot mattress gives an advantage it seems an easy decision.

Dr Tappin said he was surprised by the results of their previous survey but believed it was important to bring the findings out into the public domain to allow parents to make their own choices.

Hazel Brooke the executive director of the Scottish Cot Death Trust, also commented and said that they did not want to alarm parents with the findings and added the following : “I think that the interesting thing about the mattress data is that families are desperate to do anything they can to reduce the chances of cot deaths to their babies. And we are constantly getting phone calls from parents asking if there is anything more they can do. We feel that it would be unethical to sit on this research until five years down the line when someone else has enough data to publish. We feel we must say to parents at this stage that this is a potential risk.”

Researchers on the study also looked at 278 healthy infants to make comparisons.

The Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths FSID advises that it does not matter what kind of cot mattress is used, or whether it is new, as long as it is clean, firm, does not sag and shows no signs of deterioration.

The charity also pointed out that the new study does not say whether the used mattresses in the study met these criteria.

Dr Richard Wilson, FSID trustee and paediatrician, said: “Babies are safest sleeping on their backs on clean, firm, well-fitting mattresses.

Source Mail Online

Buying Your Mattress

Tips for Buying your mattress

If you’re buying a baby mattress for the first time then you might want some pointers on what you need to look out for. You need to guarantee your baby’s safety and comfort whilst keeping costs down. While we can provide the best prices for baby mattresses, here are some tips to help you decide what type of mattress is right for you and your baby:

1. Invest in a good quality mattress to ensure that it lasts as long as your baby needs it – it needs to be of high density to ensure that it will keep its shape.

2. Sleep is important – especially for new parents. Your baby will sleep better if they are comfortable and feel safe. A good quality mattress will provide this.

3. The mattress should be able to tick all the boxes: comfort, safety and hygiene are a must.

4. Buy a new mattress for a new baby – re-use the furniture (cot or crib) as you like, however for safety and hygienic reasons we recommend buying a new mattress. Second hand mattresses may be permanently compressed by the previous owner’s body weight and therefore can’t provide a comfortable yet firm surface for your baby.

5. Make sure you measure the cot or crib correctly before you buy your mattress. You must leave a small gap in order to fit bedding and sheets, however the gap must be below 4cm. Babies’ little arms and legs can be caught in the gaps which is an easily avoided danger. We make all our mattresses to measure, so even if you have an unusual cot or crib we can make the perfect size mattress for you.

6. It is important to keep the mattress clean for your baby’s health, safety and comfort. Buy a mattress with a removable cover that can be washed at a minimum temperature of 60c. This ensures the surface is kept clean at all times. It is wise to invest in an extra cover or two so that you can be washing one while the other is in use!

7. Regularly turn the mattress from end to end to ensure that is gets equal wear on either side. The will prolong the life of your mattress.

8. To maintain your baby’s posture, choose a mattress that is firm but comfortable. This will support your baby as they grow whilst they are sleeping during a key time of spinal growth and development.

The Mattress Factory

Water and Swimming

Swimming is a fantastic activity for your baby, but you must understand the safety issues before going into the water.

It is important to understand that a baby can drown in as little as 2 inches of water, so they must not be left unattended at any time, whether they are in the bath or a baby pool. There are plenty of products available that can help you introduce your baby to the water. These can help make swimming with your baby safer and more fun. Here are some tips for your baby’s first swim or bath…

1. Keep the baby in an upright position while in the water. This lets the baby experience the movement of the water whilst staying safe and keeping their head above the surface.

2. Many children are scared of bath time because they are worried about soap and shampoo getting in their eyes. There are now products available that will cover your baby’s eyes whilst in the bath, letting you wash their hair and head worry free.

3. Buy some bath toys to help make your baby feel at ease with the water. They will associate bath time with fun and toys, and will feel more relaxed and ready for bed after a fun bath. (And make sure they sleep well with one of our baby mattresses!)

4. A baby towel and bath robe are great gifts for parents and are essential at bath time or if you go for a swim. Keep your baby warm and clean and make them comfortable at all times.

Swimming is often one of the earliest memories someone will have as it is such a great experience for a young baby. They are able to have a complete physical workout that they wouldn’t experience outside of the water.

The Mattress Factory

Mattress Types

Different types and sizes of mattresses & How to Measure

There are many different types and sizes of cot mattresses to cater for all the different types of baby furniture. Follow our handy guide to help you find the right type of mattress for you, and how to make sure you get the correct size.

1. You have most likely already decided on the furniture you want to buy, you might have already ordered it or already have it to hand. If you are still deciding or have ordered it but it hasn’t arrived yet, you will need to rely on the manufacturers recommended dimensions for the required mattress. They will usually note this on their website, and the store you bought the furniture from should also be able to tell you the dimensions needed.
2. If you already have the furniture to hand, or you have been given an older piece of baby furniture, you must measure it yourself. It is important you measure the base of the furniture, which is where the baby mattress will sit. Measure the interior length and width of the base. We recommend taking 1-2cm off the base size of the mattress has enough room for bedding and sheets.
3. You then also need to decide on the depth of the mattress. Most manufacturers have a standard size, however requesting a thicker mattress should prolong the life of the mattress, as thicker mattresses last slightly longer.
4. Once you have the correct measurements, you need to decide on the type of mattress you want. The types of mattresses available can be summed up by basic foam, deluxe foam and foam sprung. Basic form is your standard foam mattress, which are usually the cheapest. They are fine for temporary purposes as they do not last as long as more expensive options. The deluxe foam is the basic foam mattress with a softer or quilted cover. This provides added comfort for your baby. Finally, the sprung foam is the foam mattress with springs inside. These are perfect for cot beds and last a lot longer than regular foam – if they are taken care of, they can last up to 5 years.

Once you have decided on the size and type of mattress you require, you need to find where you can buy your baby mattress. The store where you bought your furniture may give you a good deal on the correct size and type of mattress for your furniture, or you could try searching online. By buying your mattress online, you are often ordering direct from the manufacturer and will therefore find some great bargains.

The Mattress Factory

Cot mattress

Buying a cot mattress: what to look for

When buying a baby mattress for the first time there are many things you need to look out for. To ensure that you are buying a quality mattress that will be fit for purpose, you need to ensure that you buy the correct type, the correct size and a mattress that meets all British standards.

There are a few checks you can do if you’re out shopping for a baby mattress. If you’re in a store, you can test how firm the mattresses are by squeezing them in a central point. If the mattress re-shapes itself back to its original shape in good time (a few seconds) then it is likely to be of good quality and will not sag. Mattresses of lower quality tend to sag in the middle where the baby will lay more often. If you can find a mattress that re-shapes itself quite quickly, it will last your baby longer.

Also remember to ask any staff that are available if their mattresses comply with British standards. The most important ones to look out for are BS 1877 part 10 for safety and performance and BS 7177 for use of any antimony, phosphorous or arsenic based fibre retardant treatments.

Decide on the type of material you want for your baby. There are many to choose from and your choice will depend on your budget, but to make the most of your money we recommend buying a sprung foam cot mattress. This will last your baby until they are ready for a cot bed or junior bed, will not sag as the springs re-enforce the shape and will provide added comfort and posture support for your little one.

Finally, ensure you are buying the correct size by checking with your cot manufacturer or by measuring the furniture yourself. Always make sure there is no more than a 4cm gap each side.

The Mattress Factory